Category Archives: Spatial (Geometric) Theory of Choice

Polarization is Real (and Asymmetric)

Revised 16 May 2012 Christopher Hare is a PhD student in Political Science at the University of Georgia. Nolan McCarty is the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs and Chair of the Department of Politics at Princeton … Continue reading

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Senate: Vote to Invoke Cloture on JOBS Act

Below we use Optimal Classification (OC) in R to plot the Senate’s 76-22 vote to invoke cloture on the JOBS (Jumpstart our Business Startups) Act, a measure which trims federal banking and financial regulations. There are two aspects of this … Continue reading

Posted in 112th Congress, Spatial (Geometric) Theory of Choice | Leave a comment

Senate: Vote on $109B Transportation Bill

Below we use Optimal Classification (OC) in R to plot the Senate’s 74-22 vote to approve $109 billion in funding for highway projects. Support for the bill was largely bipartisan, with all Senate Democrats voting “Yea” and Senate Republicans splitting … Continue reading

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Senate Vote on Keystone XL Pipeline and House Vote on JOBS Act

Below we use Optimal Classification (OC) in R to plot the Senate’s vote to approve the Keystone pipeline (which failed, by a 56-42 margin, to reach the required 3/5 supermajority threshold), and the House’s vote on House Majority Leader Eric … Continue reading

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Video: The History of American Politics in Two Minutes

Below we use DW-NOMINATE scores to illustrate the ideological composition of each Congress (1st to the current 112th) in the following video. The first dimension (the horizontal or x-axis) represents placement along the familiar liberal-conservative spectrum; the second dimension represents … Continue reading

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Ideological Locations of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidates (Updated 5 January 2012)

In the wake of the Iowa Caucus, below we update the ideological locations of the candidates for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. For those candidates who are currently serving or have served in Congress (former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA), former … Continue reading

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Ideological Composition of the Supreme Court

Below we use the Martin-Quinn scores of judicial ideology to plot the ideological makeup of the Supreme Court. Political scientists Andrew Martin and Kevin Quinn use a technique similar to NOMINATE to estimate ideological ideal points from votes– roll calls … Continue reading

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Ideological Locations of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidates (Updated 11 November 2011)

Below we update the ideological locations of the candidates for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. For those candidates who are currently serving in Congress (e.g., Michelle Bachmann and Ron Paul), we use their Common Space DW-NOMINATE first dimension scores, which … Continue reading

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Roll Call Voting of Super Committee Members during the 112th Congress

Below we use Optimal Classification (OC) in R to isolate the voting behavior of members of the debt “super committee” on major roll calls in the 112th Congress. The super committee faces a quickly approaching November 23 deadline to recommend … Continue reading

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Recovering a Basic Space from the 2010 ANES

Below we apply the basicspace scaling method (Poole, 1998) to a set of issues in the 2010 American National Election Study (ANES) in order to explore the dimensionality of contemporary public opinion. We use the basicspace package in R to … Continue reading

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