Monthly Archives: November 2011

The Political Economy of American Economic Inequality (Opinion)

The Political Economy of American Economic Inequality 23 November 2011 Keith T. Poole and Howard Rosenthal Keith T. Poole is Philip H. Alston Distinguished Chair, Professor of Political Science at the University of Georgia and Professor Emeritus at the University … Continue reading

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House: Vote on Balanced Budget Amendment

Below we use Optimal Classification (OC) in R to plot the House’s vote on a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution. The amendment won majority support by a 261-165 margin but fell short of the 2/3 requirement for the passage … Continue reading

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Ideological Composition of the Supreme Court

Below we use the Martin-Quinn scores of judicial ideology to plot the ideological makeup of the Supreme Court. Political scientists Andrew Martin and Kevin Quinn use a technique similar to NOMINATE to estimate ideological ideal points from votes– roll calls … Continue reading

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Participation, Income, and Voting in the 2008 Presidential Election

We continue our analysis of Income and Voting using the CPS, November 2008: Voting and Registration Supplement and the CPS, November 2008: Civic Engagement Supplement. We use the same model for the Presidential elections as we used for the 2000, … Continue reading

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Ideological Locations of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidates (Updated 11 November 2011)

Below we update the ideological locations of the candidates for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. For those candidates who are currently serving in Congress (e.g., Michelle Bachmann and Ron Paul), we use their Common Space DW-NOMINATE first dimension scores, which … Continue reading

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House: Letter to Urge Debt Reduction “Super Committee” to Consider All Options

In our previous post, we plotted the Senators who were signatories to a letter opposing the inclusion of tax increases in the “Super Committee’s” debt reduction proposal. In this post, we do the same with the 100 House members (60 … Continue reading

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Senate: Letter to Oppose Tax Increases in “Super Committee” Proposal

Below we use Optimal Classification (OC) in R to plot the signatories of a letter from 33 Republican Senators to oppose new taxes as part of any deficit-reduction agreement reached by the Congressional “Super Committee,” whose November 23 deadline is … Continue reading

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Income and Voting in 2000, 2004, and 2008

Below we show the relationship between income and voting in the 2000, 2004, and 2008 Presidential Elections using the Current Population Survey (CPS, November 2000: Voting and Registration Supplement, CPS, November 2004: Voting and Registration Supplement, and CPS, November 2008:  … Continue reading

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