Monthly Archives: June 2012

House: Vote to Find Attorney General Eric Holder in Contempt of Congress

Below we use Optimal Classification (OC) in R to plot the House‚Äôs 255-67 vote to hold Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt of Congress over his refusal to turn over documents related to the House’s investigation into the Justice Department’s … Continue reading

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Revisiting the House and Senate Votes on “Obamacare”

With the Supreme Court’s ruling on the constitutionality of President Obama’s health care reform law expected Thursday, below we revisit the congressional votes on The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”). The votes in both the Senate and the … Continue reading

Posted in Contemporary American Politics, Political Polarization | Leave a comment

Landmark Legislation and Bipartisan Coalitions

Does political polarization diminish the prospects of major or landmark legislation? Not necessarily, says Mickey Kaus in a recent piece (“Two Cheers for ‘Polarization’“). His argument is that ambitious legislative proposals (for example, passing universal healthcare or changing collective bargaining … Continue reading

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Mass and Elite Political Polarization

Below we use data from the Pew Research Center’s recent report on the widening gap in the political values of partisans in the electorate to compare trends in mass and elite political polarization. Namely, we compare the difference in the … Continue reading

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NSF, Political Science Research, and the Development of NOMINATE

In our first book on NOMINATE (Congress: A Political-Economic History of Roll Call Voting, 1997), one of the roll call votes used in the introductory chapter on the spatial model of voting was the Senate’s 1981 vote to restore NSF … Continue reading

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